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51
September 1776 / Re: Chapter 2: Haxan
« Last post by RobbyPants on April 22, 2024, 11:37:29 AM »
Elizabeth nods and looks around to see if there's anything of note.

Spot = 1d20+3
Rolled 1d20+3 : 15 + 3, total 18
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D&D 3.5 and Pathfinder / Re: [DnD3.5e]How does the mount charge work?
« Last post by Quintaine on April 22, 2024, 04:49:14 AM »
The action required to Charge is a Fullround Action.

The player does not spend a Fullround Action to Charge.

The mount for the player has its own actions and it spends the Fullround Action to Charge.

The player uses their own Standard Action to Attack at the end of the mount's Charge.

The player also, under normal Mounted Combat rules, can not make a full attack action if the mount moves more than 5ft on their turn.

Stuff like Spirited Charge were not made by the same writers that wrote the Mounted Combat rules so there will be discrepancies.

For reference:
https://www.d20srd.org/srd/combat/specialAttacks.htm#mountedCombat
That means, we should ignore the charge action requirment of "Spirited Charge", right?
And I think no rules said player must use "Standard Action" to attack, Can he use a Swift action attack to mount charge?
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September 1776 / Re: Chapter 2: Haxan
« Last post by bhu on April 21, 2024, 07:24:00 PM »
"Here will do."


You are of the opinion she is suffering corruption from too much spellcasting.
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Homebrew and House Rules (D&D) / Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Last post by Garryl on April 21, 2024, 06:41:00 PM »
Solid State [General]
Prerequisite: Con 15, one Stone Dragon stance.
Benefit: You can initiate Stone Dragon stances even if you aren't in contact with the ground. While you are in a Stone Dragon stance, you gain a +1 dodge bonus to your Armor Class and you can initiate Stone Dragon maneuvers even if you aren't in contact with the ground. If you move at least 10 feet from your original position, you lose the benefit of this feat until the start of your next turn.
Normal: Stone Dragon maneuvers can only be initiated if you are in contact with the ground.
Special: You can use Solid State and your Constitution score - 2 in place of Dodge and your Dexterity score to qualify for a feat, prestige class, or other special ability.
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Homebrew and House Rules (D&D) / Re: 1001 Homebrew Ideas to Flesh Out Sometime
« Last post by Garryl on April 20, 2024, 03:51:39 PM »
Adapting an idea from Shadowrun Returns for a way to provide limited at-will healing. This would be an alternative mechanism for limiting free healing separate from the commonly used limit of up to half max hp used by things like the Dragon Shaman's Vigor aura and the Iron Heart Endurance maneuver.



Recent Wounds: When a creature loses hit points from taking damage, it is considered recently wounded. A recent wound lasts only until it is healed. If a creature loses hit points form damage while still recently wounded, its recent wound is the largest of the two. Essentially, a recent wound records the largest amount of unhealed damage taken damage sources the creature received. Some effects heal only part of a recent wound. When a creature receives healing from any source, the damage amount of its recent wound is reduced by the number of hp regained by the healing.

Notes:
- Since the recent wound only tracks unhealed damage, there is never any need to track it for any character at full hp.
- Healing is limited to the size of the largest singular hit received. Any time multiple hits come in before healing can be applied, they still apply damage that can't be freely healed.
- Current wording/implementation detracts all healing from the recent wounds, which encourages players to use as much free healing as possible before applying any resource-based healing in order to maximize the total healing, since any resource-based healing still reduces the recent wound size and thus the amount of free healing available. This should probably be changed so you can apply them in any order without losing out on the total free healing you can provide (aside from doing so much resource-based healing that the subject is healed up to full already). Would probably need to change it so that the wound size decreases only when the healing is tied to the recent wound, but also that as hp changes separately from that, the wound size gets decreased if it's ever larger than the character's missing hp at any given time.
- How would this work with delayed damage pools? Probably want to count the damage only when it gets taken from the pool to apply hp loss. Delayed damage pools would be weird, then, as they could group up multiple small hits into a single, larger recent wound, but they might also split a single large attack into two, resulting in smaller recent wounds. Hmm... maybe do it the other way, then, where the recent wound is created when the hit occurs even if it is partially or fully absorbed into the delayed damage pool. In that case, the size limit on the recent wound would be missing hp + total damage in delayed damage pools.
- Might want to have natural healing still reduce the size of recent wounds.



Heal skill: You can treat a recent wound as a full-round action. This use of the skill requires a healer's kit. A DC 20 Heal check heals the target for 1d6 hit points, +1 for every 2 points by which your Heal check exceeds the DC. The healing provided cannot exceed the damage value of the target's recent wounds.



Vital Surge martial discipline
Manipulates bodily energy flows to heal and empower allies or disorient and disable enemies. Might have a minor subtheme of channeling vital energy, sacrificing hp to deal electricity damage.
Has a variety of healing maneuvers. Some in-combat hybrid attack/healing maneuvers like Devoted Spirit. Some maneuvers that directly provide strong healing (in or out of combat) based on recent wounds.
(click to show/hide)


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D&D 3.5 and Pathfinder / Re: [DnD3.5e]How does the mount charge work?
« Last post by ketaro on April 19, 2024, 09:49:00 PM »
The action required to Charge is a Fullround Action.

The player does not spend a Fullround Action to Charge.

The mount for the player has its own actions and it spends the Fullround Action to Charge.

The player uses their own Standard Action to Attack at the end of the mount's Charge.

The player also, under normal Mounted Combat rules, can not make a full attack action if the mount moves more than 5ft on their turn.

Stuff like Spirited Charge were not made by the same writers that wrote the Mounted Combat rules so there will be discrepancies.

For reference:
https://www.d20srd.org/srd/combat/specialAttacks.htm#mountedCombat
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In D&D, a Sorcerer creates magic due to two mandatory conditions: innate power and access to the Weave. I would like to clarify, what does this "innate power" mean if isolated from the Weave? From your point of view, is it possible to rethink a Sorcerer as a mystic who will not have access to the Weave (and, as a result, unable to cast spells), and who will channel his innate power in some other way? For example, instead of casting spells, will he be able to create various non-magical effects (like Ki or Psionics) that do not require from him touching the Weave?

I will answer to your lore question, which is an irony only those who know me well could appreciate.

Since you mention the Weave, it appears you are somewhere in the Forgotten Realms (FR) twin-worlds of Aber or Toril. (Probably Toril.)

Mechanically speaking, all magic MUST go through the Weave in Forgotten Realms. The God(s) of Magic have decreed it to be so and enforce it upon the local Prime... which is why the Shadow Weave is such a big deal and ongoing conflict. The "innate power" means that the character has been born with a natural connection to the Weave, rather than a learned or otherwise acquired one.

I'd like to play a Sorcerer who (like any Sorcerer) has an inner power, but because of an ancestral curse he doesn't have access to the Weave. Instead of spells, he transforms his inner power to materialize sort of "Spiritual Guardian" (like Soulbound Summoner in Pathfinder), and can weaken enemies by slightly lowering their combat stats.

The only in-lore example of non-Weave creatures that have powers are psionics. Psionic creatures are completely separate from the Weave. Even the God of Magic cannot stop a psionic creature from using their powers (though there are wild psionic and null psionic zones in FR, and a savvy Greater Power can absolutely manipulate that to their advantage, and the psionic creature's disadvantage, just so your DM knows).

Mechanically speaking, any psionic creature is considered to contain their own independent internal mini-Weave that is under their absolute control and has no connection with the Weave of magic.

Lore wise, psionics are so rare in FR, that almost everyone except for the very learned and a few specific types of monsters, will simply treat you as a magic user with all the pros and cons based on which region of the world you are in. Some love magic users, some hate magic users, and some have jealous magic users who dislike any apparent threat or challenge to their power and local authority.

Yuan-ti in the South and the Illithid, Grey dwarves, Aboleths and so forth of the Underdark are the two main sources of psionics in FR - and anywhere in the vicinity of their communities, the general psionic emanations can cause other species to give birth to psionic offspring. These could serve as your regions of origin: The South or any place with a known access to the Underdark, or even the Underdark itself.



In order to play a "Sorcerer" type character, picking a Psion (INT based) or Wilder (CHA based) works. A psion has access to a greater number of powers and is considered more meditative/intellectual, while the Wilder has access to fewer powers, is considered more emotional/passionate, but has a Wild Surge ability that can boost certain powers above normal limits - at a small risk of losing control and wasting the attempt to manifest the power with some exhaustion on top as a limitation. The psion is usually compared to the wizard, and a wilder to a sorcerer, but in reality either can serve as a sorcerer-type - just depends on which mechanics you feel fit your character better.

Psionics (in 3rd ed) no longer have access to summon creature type effects generally speaking - it was replaced by the Astral Construct power which allows you to pull ectoplasm from the astral or ethereal and build a temporary and customized construct on the fly (full round action) each time you call it forth. There is also an Astral Tasker power chain from 3.0 that allows for more options. It is not unreasonable to ask the DM to allow you to make a skill check to shape the construct into a creature of choice (but just use the standard default stats and options to keep things easy). As a bonus, Astral Constructs are translucent which would give it the appearance of a spirit guardian, though it is solid. Make it glow, and you sort of have the Patronus from Harry Potter.

Furthermore, there are debuff powers available to psionics, so you could pretty much build a character as you described in all respects by carefully selecting which powers your character can use - except if you wanted your 'spirit guardians' to be non-physical, though there may be a way around that with enough research.



Thus lore-wise (and mechanically speaking), psionics provide around a 90% match to what you have described as desired for your character. Here is a link with more details: https://forgottenrealms.fandom.com/wiki/Psionics
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Most commonly (but not exclusively), being a Sorcerer means you have a dragon somewhere in your family line. 5e and PF have a number of subclasses who build on different lineages of sorcerers, and outside of the PHB, 3.5 also has a lot of Alternative Class Features building on Sorcerers of a different background: https://forums.giantitp.com/showthread.php?444354

D&D 3.5 has a psionic version of the Sorcerer in the form of the Wilder, found in the SRD: https://www.d20srd.org/srd/psionic/classes/wilder.htm

There are two somewhat curse-based, spontaneous arcane spellcasting debuffing base classes in D&D 3.5, Hexblade from Complete Warrior from and Jester from Dragon Compendium. While they might serve as a foundation, they are both not very good and severely lacking, especially for a first time player.
Other classes that could carry the general idea:


Of all those options, I consider Dragonfire Adept as the most beginner-friendly - it was published for free by WotC (class, breath effects), is an at-will blaster with built-in debuffing rider effects, favours Constitution (so it is more forgiving of beginner mistakes by having a lot of HP and a good Fort save) - and the fluff makes it easy to segue in dragon-bloodline-based sorcery, if that is your thing, and like Sorcerers it benefits from Charisma as it sets the save DCs.
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Min/Max 3.x / Re: Full spell list
« Last post by nijineko on April 18, 2024, 06:30:54 PM »
Thank you again for your fabulous work!
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Min/Max 3.x / Re: Fun Finds v7.0 - Now with +15% more reposts!
« Last post by nijineko on April 18, 2024, 05:37:00 PM »

A second item of note from the same book is a great find for those max-range archery builds.  The Archer's Standard will likely require someone else to carry it for you (thri-kreen and other 4-armed archers can manage it solo) but it lets you ignore all penalties associated with an additional range increment and also extends your maximum range by 1 increment (11 normally, 16 for Cragtop Archer).
Arcing shot allows one to ignore ranged penalties anyway, and Farsight reduces the penalties to -1 per increment all the time. Still, nice for those times where there is a ceiling to account for, and for the extra increment.

Wonder if there is a shield that can hold a standard... then make it dancing for those who are not Thri-Kreen.
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